Chinese Red Envelopes

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What started out as a design experiment has turned into something much more personal. Being Taiwanese, but born + raised in San Francisco, it often felt like the “cultural” stuff existed very separately from this “modern,” American life. Chinese things were boring, old-fashioned, and embarrassing; American things were cool! popular!! and glamorous!!! But recently—maybe because I’m older, maybe it’s all the time I’ve spent overseas—stripping the old ideas away and weaving the best of both worlds into each other has been super important and of interest in my life. Not to make some watered-down mix, but living + exploring both sides at full volume, and sharing that with those around me.  The red envelopes have become an embodiment of that mission—I wanted to challenge the perception of what Chinese was: Does something have to be cheap + tacky to be Chinese? Or can I show that something so Chinese can also be modern, creative, and beautiful, something that appeals universally, and something we can be proud to celebrate? In bringing together seemingly disparate worlds, I think we create something richer, more personal, and yet ultimately more relatable.

What started out as a design experiment has turned into something much more personal. Being Taiwanese, but born + raised in San Francisco, it often felt like the “cultural” stuff existed very separately from this “modern,” American life. Chinese things were boring, old-fashioned, and embarrassing; American things were cool! popular!! and glamorous!!! But recently—maybe because I’m older, maybe it’s all the time I’ve spent overseas—stripping the old ideas away and weaving the best of both worlds into each other has been super important and of interest in my life. Not to make some watered-down mix, but living + exploring both sides at full volume, and sharing that with those around me.

The red envelopes have become an embodiment of that mission—I wanted to challenge the perception of what Chinese was: Does something have to be cheap + tacky to be Chinese? Or can I show that something so Chinese can also be modern, creative, and beautiful, something that appeals universally, and something we can be proud to celebrate? In bringing together seemingly disparate worlds, I think we create something richer, more personal, and yet ultimately more relatable.

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Available for purchase here.